Q: In your twenty years at Schering-Plough and Merck, what were your various roles?
I joined Schering-Plough in the early 90’s and started out with a broad range of responsibilities including strategic patent portfolio management, client counseling, freedom-to-operate assessments, patent due diligence in support of in-licensing, patent preparation and prosecution, and patent litigation. With regard to technologies, my work primarily involved small molecule pharmaceuticals, new polymorphs, proteins, protein conjugates, antibodies, and chemical and biotech process technology; and while most of my work was in the pharmaceutical area, I also had the chance to work on cases related to contact lenses and optical inspection systems as Schering owned a contact lens subsidiary back then. Over time, I began to focus more on tech transfer and licensing, as well as global patent litigation. Read more »
     
Written By: Lawrence E. Ashery
When legal principles are at odds with each other, it can be immensely difficult to reach a conclusion that is fair and just. Such is the dilemma in Nautilus v. Biosig Instruments, 572 U.S. _______ (2014). The case has been talked about for months, and seen by some as a possible major step forward in the "war" against "patent trolls." Read more »
     
Washington, D.C. | July 2014 – RatnerPrestia is pleased to announce that Sunjeev Sikand has joined its Washington, D.C. office in a move from McKenna Long and Aldridge. Sunjeev specializes in patent litigation, patent counseling and prosecution, licensing and due diligence. Read more »
     
Written By: Derek Richmond
Over the last few years, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (“CAFC”) has held that a means-plus-function term in a claim relating a computer implemented invention must be supported by a corresponding structure, which can be an algorithm, explicitly or implicitly disclosed in the specification. However, the Federal Circuit’s recent execution of this “corresponding algorithm” rule might be a bit strict in view of the history of the rule. The CAFC recently interpreted a software means-plus-function claim in Triton Tech of Texas, LLC v. Nintendo of America, Inc., 2013-1476 (Fed. Cir. June 13, 2014). The rule that the CAFC currently follows is that something more than a general purpose computer, i.e., an algorithm, must be disclosed as the “means” to perform a function. However, in deciding Triton Tech, the CAFC might have required a bit more disclosure than was required in the past. Read more »
     
A unanimous Supreme Court today ruled that software patents based on abstract ideas that merely require generic computer implementation are ineligible for patent protection, affirming the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit’s recent en banc decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank Int’l. This ruling does not render all software-related inventions ineligible for patent protection, but does call into question the validity of countless number of patents asserted by so called patent “trolls” against U.S. and foreign businesses.

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Written By: Gleb Epelbaum and Rex Donnelly
In POM Wonderful LLC v. The Coca Cola Co., 572 U.S. ___ (Jun. 12, 2014), a unanimous Supreme Court held that a private suit brought by a competitor under § 43 of the Lanham Act is not precluded by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) and the FDA regulations.

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Valley Forge, PA | June 2014 Kenneth N. Nigon, a familiar contributor of the Practising Law Institute and Shareholder at RatnerPrestia, will co-chair and speak at PLI’s Advanced Patent Prosecution Workshop 2014: Claim Drafting & Amendment Writing. The program is scheduled for July 17-18, 2014 in New York City and marks Nigon’s seventh year participating in the event and his second year as co-chair of the New York workshop. Read more »
     
Brian P. O’Shaughnessy, Managing Shareholder of RatnerPrestia’s Washington, DC office, and LES Regional Vice President, USA will present LES on Capitol Hill – Working with Legislators toward Sound & Effective Patent Policies that Encourage Innovation. The event takes place on Wednesday, June 11 at Basking Ridge Country Club in New Jersey. Read more »
     
Today, a unanimous Supreme Court reversed the Federal Circuit and held that induced infringement of a method claim cannot be found in the absence of direct infringement by a single party under §271(a). Limelight Networks, Inc. v. Akamai Technologies, Inc., 572 U.S. __(June 2, 2014). Read more »
     
The U.S. Supreme Court issued a unanimous decision today in Nautilus, Inc. v. Biosig Instruments, Inc. (No. 13-369), a closely watched case involving the statutory requirement of distinct patent claiming. This is the latest in a series of recent cases in which the Supreme Court has overruled the Federal Circuit on critical patent issues. Read more »
     
 
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